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Zoom, half a million accounts sold on the Dark Web

Zoom, half a million accounts sold on the Dark Web

By Giacomo Martiradonna Wednesday 15 April 2020

If you use Zoom to work, see friends and keep in touch with our loved ones, know that your account may have been sold on the Dark Web. Here's how to protect yourself.

Zoom Account Violation Sold on the Dark Web

Now that everyone we use Zoom to work, see friends and keep in touch with our loved ones, the cold shower arrives: half a million accounts have been hacked and sold on the dark web. Here's what you need to do to stay calm – but do it now.

Videoconference with Zoom: attention to privacy and security

Videoconference with Zoom: attention to privacy and security

Now that we all use video conferencing, we need to pay attention to the tools we use, and what information we send around.

In recent weeks, thanks to the spread of Coronavirus and the entry into force of social distancing and pandemic containment measures, videoconferencing applications such as Zoom have seen a dizzying growth in their user base. And as you know, when a spotlight is aimed at a platform, hackers and crackers begin to paw.

In the past few hours, on the Dark Web, they have emerged further 530,000 Zoom credentials working, sold at a paltry price of $ 0.0020 each. As far as we understand, it would not be a new leak or a mass violation, but rather a so-called "credential stuffing attack." In practice, hackers would have used previously hacked accounts to attempt logging into the platform, and would have collected the functioning ones in a database. This was made possible by the fact that users tend to recycle always the same passwords to access online services.

Some advise you to check whether your address has been violated, and then possibly change your password: we tell you to change it now the Zoom password regardless of everything. So, you cut the bull's head.