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Difference between ordinary invoice and money bill

In the legislation, all proposals are presented in Parliament, for discussion as invoices. When a law is approved by both Houses of Parliament and approved by the President, it turns out to be a law. The speaker decides whether a bill is an ordinary bill or a bill of exchange. An ordinary bill is a bill that can be presented for discussion in one of the two houses of Parliament, a minister or a private member.

On the contrary, a cash account is presented in the lower house of Parliament, ie the Lok Sabha, for discussion, by a minister. There are a number of points that differentiate an ordinary bill from a money bill, which is discussed in the points indicated below.

Comparative graph

Basis for the ordinary comparison Bill of money
Sense An ordinary bill that contains materials other than those covered by the bill, financial bill, order that replaces bills of exchange and bills of incorporation. A money bill refers to a government bill that deals with money matters, such as the imposition and abolition of taxes, loans, governmental expenses, etc.
introduction Introduced in the lower chamber or in the upper chamber of Parliament, by a minister or by a private member. Introduced in the lower house of Parliament only by a minister.
Chairman's recommendation Unnecessary Obligatory
Powers of the President The president can approve, reject or return the bill for review. The president can approve or reject the bill.
Rajya Sabha It can modify, refuse or make recommendations on the ordinary invoice. It can only make recommendations on the money bill.
Period of detention Rajya Sabha can hold the cash account for up to 6 months. Rajya Sabha can hold the invoice for a period not exceeding 14 days.
President's approval If the bill is introduced for the first time in the lower house, the approval of the speaker is not required during the transmission to the upper house. Requires the approval of Speaker while transferring him to the Upper House.
Joint session It can be held in case of stall. It cannot be held back

Definition of ordinary Bill

An ordinary bill described as a draft containing a proposed statute, which must pass through different phases, to become an act. It contains all the issues that are not covered by the bill, the financial bill, the order that replaces the bills and the bills of incorporation. It can be presented for discussion, in one of the two houses by a private member or minister.

Suppose a bill is introduced in the lower house of Parliament and, after being approved, it is sent to the upper house which can approve the bill or suggest amendments to the bill and return it to the lower house within six months. When both houses pass the bill, he is sent to the President for his consent. The President can give his consent or withdraw the same or return the account for review.

If the two houses disagree or if the account held by the other house for more than six months, a joint session of the two houses is called by the president. The president of the Lok Sabha presides over the joint session and a simple majority is needed to resolve the deadlock.

Definition of Bill of Money

The bill of money a law containing the bill concerning the imposition and abolition of taxes, loans, money allocations from consolidated funds, auditing and accounting and so on are defined as the money bill. These bills can only be introduced for discussion in the House of the People, namely the Lok Sabha and also that of a single minister.

After the bill passed from the lower house, it is transferred to the upper house or to the House of States, namely Rajya Sabha, who can only approve the bill or suggest changes to the bill, but does not have the power to reject it. Subsequently, the bill must be returned to the lower house, within fourteen days from the date of receipt of the invoice.

Now it is up to the lower house to accept or reject the recommendations made by the upper house. If the lower house accepts the recommendation, the account is considered passed by both houses. And if the recommendations are not accepted by the lower house, then it is also believed to have been passed by both houses. Furthermore, if the bill is not returned to the Lok Sabha within the stipulated deadline, the bill is considered approved by both chambers.

After the bill has been sent to the President for his consent, who can approve and disapprove the bill. And once approved, it becomes an act.

Key differences between ordinary Bill and Bill

The difference between ordinary invoice and money bill can be clearly expressed for the following reasons:

  1. An ordinary invoice can be understood as any invoice that takes into account issues other than those covered by the money bill, the financial bill, the order that replaces the invoices and the bills of amendment of the constitution. On the other hand, a money bill implies a bill that deals with money matters, such as taxation, alteration and abolition of taxes, public spending, consolidated funds, loans, etc.
  2. Ordinary laws are introduced by a minister or a private member in one of the two chambers of the Parliament. Conversely, a cash account is introduced in the lower house of Parliament only by a minister.
  3. In the case of ordinary invoices, no recommendation is made by the President, while invoices require the recommendation of the President.
  4. When it comes to the cash account, the President can only accept or reject the account. Unlike the ordinary account in which the President can accept, reject or return the bill for review.
  5. Rajya Sabha can modify or reject the ordinary invoice. However, he can only make recommendations on the bill, but he cannot refuse it.
  6. The other house of Parliament can hold an ordinary bill for a maximum period of 6 months. In contrast, Rajya Sabha can hold the cash account for up to 14 days.
  7. Speaker certification is not required if the bill is first introduced into the Lok Sabha while being transferred to the Rajya Sabha. As against, the approval of the Speaker becomes mandatory in case of a money bill.
  8. The deadlock situation can arise in the case of an ordinary bill, when the two houses disagree or when the other house keeps the bill for more than six months. On the contrary, there is no possibility of stalling in the case of a money bill, and therefore there is no common sitting of the two houses.

Conclusion

The two types of invoices deal with different issues, since money is considered important in a money bill, an ordinary invoice can be an invoice that does not cover money, finance, amendment and replacement of any invoice. In principle, the two bills differ in the provisions regarding the introduction, the recommendation, the period of detention, the joint session and so on.