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Right to oblivion: 2.4 million requests for removal from Google

Google has received over 2.4 million requests to remove URLs from its search engine based on European laws on the "right to oblivion", since they were introduced in May 2014

Google has received over 2.4 million requests to remove URLs from its search engine based on European laws on " right to oblivion ", Since they were introduced in May 2014. The new data come from Google's decision to extend transparency reports and, starting today, will also add new data dating back to January 2016.

Right to oblivion Google

The new data will also show the demarcation between the requests of private and non-private subjects, such as government officials or companies, the content of the request, the content of the site and the rate of content elimination.

Right to oblivion requests

Among the reasons behind the requests, the "professional information"Are at the top of the list and amount to about a quarter (24%) of requests, followed by 10% personal reasons and crime and professional offenses 8% and 7% respectively. Google also outlined some examples of requests received, the context of why the requests were made and the result derived.

right to oblivion requests

Right to oblivion

About a third of the requests for removal result related to social media and directory services, while about 21% involved news providers and government websites which mostly dealt with the history of someone's legal affairs. Google has published a draft of its research paper on the subject, entitled Three years of the Right to be Forgotten

Right to oblivion jurisprudence

There European Court of Justice established in May 2014 read on the "right to oblivion?, Which allow European citizens to request search engines like Google's rremove information about yourselffrom the results. The search engine should therefore check whether such information is "inaccurate, inadequate, irrelevant or excessive" and whether a public interest in this regard remains.

right to oblivion requests

Right to oblivion: the infographic on requests received by Google